Diese Frage wartet auf Beantwortung

Why don't you disclose the refund amount beforehand?

I booked a Flexpreis ticket yesterday for today, but I wasn't able to use it today. It was still prior to the train's departure, so I attempted to cancel the ticket. Your web site said I couldn't cancel it, but could still get a refund. So I walked through the steps to do this, and only at the very end after I'd confirmed was I told that I'd receive back €21.50 on a €39 ticket.

My question is, *why don't you disclose this up front*? I went through several pages to get the refund, and nowhere was I told how much it would be until it was too late to change my mind. If I'd known that I'd only receive back half my money, I would have kept the ticket and possibly used it at a later date. Now I have no ticket and only half my money back for it.

I don't understand why in the ticket cancellation process there's no clear disclosure of how much money I'll receive back when I cancel.

Ryan
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The fee in case of cancellation (local trains: 17,50€, long-distance-trains: 19,00€) is displayed during booking. But this piece of information is not repeated when you cancel the ticket.

Many customers complaind, but German Rail does not improve its cancellation website.
See here (in German):
https://community.bahn.de/questions/1346935-null-kulanzwille-unseriose-stornogebuhren

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Hi, Deutsche Bahn,

You didn't answer the question, though. The question is: Why don't you disclose this when I'm *getting a refund on the ticket*? This seems like the most obvious time to fully disclose the terms.

I had thought that I couldn't get my money back on the first day of the ticket's validity. Yet the train hadn't left yet, and the DB web site told me I *could* get a refund. I didn't know it was a refund less €17.50, and the web site *didn't tell me* until I'd already gone all the way through the process and it was too late to change my mind.

My question is, why do you tell me I can get a refund but not disclose that you're going to steal €17.50 from my refund? That's not what the word "refund" means. If you had told me during the process that I'd lose €17.50 from my €39 tickets, I wouldn't have gone through with the refund. Is this the reason you didn't tell me?

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@DB
Ich glaube, der Fragesteller will darauf hinaus, dass die Stonobedingungen (insbesondere die Stonogebühr) vor dem Stornierungsbutton nicht nochmal angezeigt werden.
Bei der Buchung weden die Preise und die Konditionen klar angezeigt, bevor man auf den Button "zahlungspflichtig buchen" klicken darf.
Bei der Stornierung ist das nicht so. Da muss man sich an die Konditionen erinnern, die man bei der Buchung akzeptiert hat. Die anfallende Stornogebühr wird nicht angezeigt, bevor man auf "stornieren" klickt, sondern erst danach - und dann kann man die Stornierung nicht mehr rückgängig machen.
Auch auf die Gefahr, mich zu wiederholen: Hier könnte die DB mit minimalem Aufwand die Anzahl der unzufriedenen Kunden reduzieren.

I understand it, Ryan. In the login area on bahn.com you can find in your last bookings in the details the note that the refund is free before the first day. In reverse, it is said that it isn't free from the day of travel. We have also a theme page on bahn.com on how to refund a flexible fare ticket. Sorry for the inconvenience. /ch

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Hi, DB,

That's all lovely, but it doesn't help me now. Is every DB customer required to learn this only through painful experience? If the bridge were out on the road ahead, would you put a sign in front of the spot with the missing bridge, or only publish a notice about it in the town newspaper and assume people would notice it?

It doesn't make any sense not to put this information on the screens before one refunds a not-completely-refundable ticket. So, how do we go about getting it there?

And in light of the fact that this information wasn't disclosed anywhere that was reasonably noticeable while I was attempting to get a refund, may I either get the rest of my money back, or return what was refunded and get my ticket back? I feel that it was impolite at best, not to say dishonest, to take away my ticket *and* half my money.

You can't get back a cancelled ticket and you can't use it for another days either. A ticket has days of validity. You can't use a Flexticket as a blank ticket. You get an information about the fee while booking the ticket. You accepted the terms of use with your booking. I can't help you to getting back the fee or the ticket. /ti

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Let's try this again:

It doesn't make any sense not to put this information on the screens before one refunds a not-completely-refundable ticket. So, how do we go about getting it there?

You can see the fee on the ticket and you accepted the terms of use. You can ask our Kundendialog (customer dialogue) for goodwill but I can't give you anything back. /ti

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Actually, "ti", the fee is not disclosed on the ticket. My ticket was an online ticket, and it only says this:

"Umtausch/Erstattung kostenlos bis 1 Tag vor Reiseantritt (Hinfahrt)"

Now perhaps this does imply a fee on the day of travel. But it does not say what the fee would be. From this text, it could be any amount. If it were, say, €1, rather than nearly half the cost of the ticket, I wouldn't care so much.

If you don't believe me, I'm happy to forward you the online ticket PDF so you can have a look for yourself, if you can tell me how to send it to you. (You can contact me using the e-mail address in my DB profile, for example.)

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But as I said, it does not disclose what the fee would be. With the oblique wording on the ticket, the fee could be anything from €0.01 to nearly the entire value of the ticket. How can I make an informed choice about whether to request a refund on the day of travel without that rather vital information?

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My dear fellow, in this day and age I have about a thousand sets of terms and conditions that I have to agree to on a daily basis, simply to so much as use e-mail or the Internet or do my work. I do apologize ever so profusely for not having every single set at my fingertips at every single moment.

Nonetheless, it is a fact that DB offered me a refund (Erstattung). Which was a lie, because at the end of the refund process, they said "By the way, what we really meant was a half-refund."

If the process had said "We can offer you a Halb-Erstattung" then I would've turned it down. If it had said "We're going to dock you €17.50" I would've said no thanks.

Instead, you waited until afterwards to share the full conditions with me.

That is dishonest, and instead of defending it, you should be ashamed.

Now rather than continuing this tedious discussion, how about letting me know whom I need to contact in order to get your web site corrected to share this rather vital information *during* a refund rather than immediately afterwards.

Thank you ever so much.

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Fragen wir mal anders:
Was würde es die DB kosten, wenn vor der Stornierung ein Fenster eingeblendet wird "Die Stornierung kostet 19,00€/17,50€ Gebühr und kann nicht rückgängig gemacht werden. Sind Sie sicher, dass Sie stornieren wollen?"
Dadurch würde sich die DB viele unzufriedene / enttäuschte Kunden ersparen.